Monday, March 23, 2015

RSVP BABES (Beginning Alcohol and Addictions Basic Education Studies)

EDITOR’S NOTE: Each week, we feature intergenerational program ideas that were tried and successful. This series is a tool to highlight various age-optimized programs and practices. The program descriptions are provided by representatives of the programs. Inclusion in this series does not imply Generations United’s endorsement or recommendation, but rather encourages ideas to inspire other programs.

This week’s cool idea is RSVP BABES, a Beloit, WI-based program that uses colorful puppets to encourage children to live happy, healthy lives free from abuse.

(Check our archives for parts 1-37.)

Trained RSVP volunteers using BABES (Beginning Alcohol and Addictions Basic Education Studies) puppets and a script present accurate, nonjudgmental and age-appropriate information to all second grade classes in Portage County. 

The program is designed to help children by promoting self-esteem, defining peer pressure and practicing good decision-making skills.

The program also helps the children understand and develop skills necessary to cope with unhappy situations and stresses the importance of asking for help.

Got something cool you tried that was successful? Why not tweet your cool intergenerational ideas to #cooligideas? You can also post them to our Intergenerational Connections Facebook Group. We want to highlight innovative age-optimized programs and practices through our blog, social media and weekly e-newsletter! Share the inspiration.

2 comments:

Jan Lossing said...

BABES is a wonderful program and I'm so glad to see it being presented by the RSVP volunteers in Wisconsin. Please send me more information on how this is being funded and any other groups involved. Thanks, keep up the good work!

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